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Politics

Politics Report: The State of ‘State of’ Speeches – Voice of San Diego

Politics Report: The State of ‘State of’ Speeches – Voice of San Diego

Politics
California Gov. Gavin Newsom takes questions from reporters in Sacramento. / Photo by Sara Libby This is the time of year for “states of … ” speeches. We were in Sacramento for Gov. Gavin Newsom’s first State of the State speech. On the one hand, we were excited that he mentioned San Diego. It was further proof that the new governor knows San Diego exists. On the other hand, Sara Libby noted that the only mentions of San Diego were for negative things: San Diego Gas and Electric’s credit rating downgrade, our hepatitis A crisis and that high-speed rail would never reach us. Otherwise, good on San Diego for getting noticed. This week marked five years since the election of Mayor Kevin Faulconer to finish the term vacated by former Mayor Bob Filner. In his Stat...
Week In Politics: Trump’s National Emergency Declaration – NPR

Week In Politics: Trump’s National Emergency Declaration – NPR

Politics
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with political commentators, David Brooks of The New York Times, and Matthew Yglesias of Vox, about President Trump's national emergency declaration on Friday. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: So now we're going to talk more about the political response to all of this, and for that I'm joined by Matthew Yglesias of Vox. Welcome back to the studio. MATTHEW YGLESIAS: Glad to be here. CORNISH: And David Brooks of The New York Times - welcome back, David. DAVID BROOKS, BYLINE: Good to be here. CORNISH: OK, so let's talk about the response. First of all, it was Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who announced this yesterday, and people were trying to read something into McConnell being the one to say this since it had been ...

On Politics: The Biggest Stories of the Week – The New York Times

Politics
Supported byOn Politics: The Biggest Stories of the WeekFeb. 16, 2019From the border wall fight to conflict with Iran, it’s been a busy week in American politics. Here are some of the biggest stories you might have missed (and some links if you’d like to read further).___________________Trump declares national emergency to build border wallHouse and Senate negotiators agreed “in principle” on Monday to provide $1.375 billion for physical barriers at the southwestern border. The deal provided much less funding than the proposal President Trump rejected in December, and his border wall took a back seat in Congress’s budget negotiations, which instead focused on the record number of immigrants in detention. (Here are five takeaways from the deal.)Mr. Trump said o...
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Anything to Declare? – The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Anything to Declare? – The Atlantic

Politics
What We’re Following TodayIt’s Friday, February 15. President Donald Trump signed a spending deal to avert a government shutdown.But Wait, There’s More: During his free-associative remarks from the Rose Garden, Trump said that he is officially declaring a national emergency in order to access funds to build his border wall. He also plans to reallocate approximately $8 billion in agency funds. Many Republicans have expressed misgivings about the move, and Trump’s decision serves as a test of their willingness to oppose the president. In response, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said they’ll take action “in the Congress, in the Courts, and in the public.”Trump, in his speech, seemed to undermine his own case for...
How Identity Politics Admissions Hurts Most College Students – Wall Street Journal

How Identity Politics Admissions Hurts Most College Students – Wall Street Journal

Politics
Feb. 14, 2019 6:56 p.m. ET Regarding Heather Mac Donald’s “Diversity Delusions at North Carolina” (op-ed, Feb. 11): A simplified example of the direct counterproductive outcomes of lowered admissions standards for minority STEM applicants was clearly on display at my daughters’ small, rural Virginia middle school in the 1990s. Several parents petitioned the school principal to offer an accelerated math class for seventh-graders who were tested to be ready for a more challenging curricula, math being particularly susceptible to “losing” students who... .. Source link
Spain to get 3rd gov’t in 4 years amid fragmenting politics – The Associated Press

Spain to get 3rd gov’t in 4 years amid fragmenting politics – The Associated Press

Politics
MADRID (AP) — Spain will elect its third government in less than four years after Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s fragile socialist government acknowledged Friday its support had evaporated and called an early general election. Sanchez’s eight-month-old administration met its end after failing to get parliament’s approval for its 2019 budget proposal earlier this week, adding to the political uncertainty that has dogged Spain in recent years. “Between doing nothing and continuing without a budget, or giving the chance for Spaniards to speak, Spain should continue looking ahead,” Sanchez said in a televised appearance from the Moncloa Palace, the seat of government, after an urgent Cabinet meeting. The ballot will ...
Gundlach on U.S. socialism politics: ‘There was a thing called the Soviet Union…’ – Yahoo Finance

Gundlach on U.S. socialism politics: ‘There was a thing called the Soviet Union…’ – Yahoo Finance

Politics
Leading bond investor DoubleLine Capital CEO Jeffrey Gundlach said that the increasing usage of the term of “democratic socialism” by American politicians is ill-advised given the track record of countries that followed it.“[Democratic socialism] puts the word democratic in front of the word socialism, because it sounds good, that at least you're voting for it, instead of being forced into it,” Gundlach told Yahoo Finance’s Julia La Roche in an interview this week. “But you know, socialism is not a very good way of building wealth, as shown by... hundreds of years of history, most recently down in Venezuela. That's all you have to look at.“I remember there was a thing called the Soviet Union, which had five year plans, and I don't think they're aro...
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Emergency Contact – The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Emergency Contact – The Atlantic

Politics
What We’re Following TodayIt’s Thursday, February 14. President Donald Trump plans to sign the congressional deal to avert a government shutdown, but the White House says Trump will “take another executive action—including a national emergency” in order to bypass Congress for border-wall funding. (Here’s a refresher on the legal showdown that might result.)Meanwhile, William Barr was sworn in as the new attorney general after being confirmed by the Senate earlier today. Here’s what else we’re following:“A Deliberate Liar”: Andrew McCabe writes in an exclusive book excerpt for The Atlantic that “the president and his men were trying to work me the way a criminal brigade would operate.” The former acting FBI director ...
It’s not a national emergency for Trump, it’s a political one – NBC News

It’s not a national emergency for Trump, it’s a political one – NBC News

Politics
Breaking News EmailsGet breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.SUBSCRIBEFeb. 15, 2019, 1:44 PM GMTBy Chuck Todd, Mark Murray and Carrie DannWASHINGTON — Let’s be honest: The emergency that President Trump faces at the border isn’t a real national emergency — it’s a perceived political one.And that’s why, after Congress passed a deal on Thursday that includes just $1.375 billion for fencing and barriers, the president is set to declare a national emergency and take executive action to secure the money to build his desired border wall, opening a Pandora’s Box and guaranteeing months and years of lawsuits over his action.Trump delivers remarks at the White House on this at 10:00 am ET.As ...
Trump Organization scraps plans for hotel chains, blaming politics – CBS News

Trump Organization scraps plans for hotel chains, blaming politics – CBS News

Politics
President Donald Trump's company is ditching plans for two new hotel chains announced two years ago, casting blame in part on a hostile political environment.The Trump Organization said Thursday that it will no longer try to open hotels under its Scion and American Idea brands catering to budget and mid-priced travelers, a departure from its focus on luxury hotels. The announcement comes as the company has posted losses at a few of its golf properties and brand experts say it has lost some of its appeal.When the plans were announced in 2017, they raised ethics concerns because of the company's strategy to convince local real estate developers and investors to pay for the properties. Ethics experts said such a structure could raise the possibility that some investors would use the propertie...